Category Archives: Harassing the Hobgoblins

The Well-Educated Mind

Bauer, Susan Wise.  The Well-Educated Mind: A Guide to the Classical Education You Never Had.  New York: Norton, 2003. This isn’t just a book review.  I am also making a template on how to approach literature, as given by Bauer. Anyone … Continue reading

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An Apologetics Primer

My church group began discussing ideas about an apologetics course this summer.  I’m wondering what kind of books to use.  Nothing too advanced.  And I don’t want this to become a “different styles of apologetics.”  Those discussions are usually as … Continue reading

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Review: For Faith and Clarity

Beilby, James. ed. For Faith and Clarity: Philosophical Contributions to Christian Theology. This book is not an intro to apologetics. It’s not even an intermediate text. It’s more like a supplement to some theological issues in apologetics. On the whole it … Continue reading

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Review: McCall, Invitation to Analytic Theology

This is an old review, but I thought I had already posted it.  I hadn’t. Despite it’s relatively simple-sounding and generic title, this book is unique in offering both a model for analytic theology as well as a brief crash … Continue reading

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Plantinga, God, Freedom, and Evil

Plantinga, summarizing his earlier work in The Nature of Necessity and God and Other Minds, demonstrates that the theist does not face a contradiction in a) asserting God exists and b) evil exists. In this work Plantinga also deals with … Continue reading

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Review: Plantinga, Nature of Necessity

The most difficult yet most important book (outside of Bible) I have read. Somebody described this book perfectly: “I felt like I was up against a Level 97 Boss and I was only Level 70.” Plantinga begins his survey of modal … Continue reading

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Bringing the nous into the heart

This is from John Mcguckin’s The Path of Christianity: The First Thousand Years, pp. 862-869.  It is very difficult for many people to approach the ancient fathers on prayer.  For some, it looks too much like Buddhism.  And for many activists … Continue reading

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al-Kindi’s argument against eternal universe

Strictly speaking, this isn’t the cosmological argument, because as it stands there is no inference to a creating Agent.  But it does establish the groundwork for it.  This is from William Lane Craig’s Kalam Cosmological Argument, pp. 23-27. There are six self-evident … Continue reading

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Review: The Logic of God Incarnate

by Thomas Morris. This is an incredible primer in analytic theology. Not the first intro text to be sure (that would be McCall), but indispensable nonetheless. Does the claim “Jesus is God the Son” introduce incoherence into the Incarnation? Morris … Continue reading

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The Outrageous Idea of Christian Scholarship

by George Marsden.  Oxford University Press. Instead of “Outrageous Idea of Christian Scholarship,” we can name it the “Unstable idea of a halfway-covenant going by the name of Christian scholarship.” A key argument:  Here is the problem.  Secularists object to Christians … Continue reading

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