Tag Archives: analytic philosophy

Review: Plantinga, Warrant and Proper Function

Plantinga begins by examining the Gettier-type problems that internalist accounts of knowledge face. Having shown these difficulties, Plantinga is now able to set the stage for his externalist approach to warrant. This he does by explaining our design function: Any well formed … Continue reading

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Plantinga: God and Other Minds

And so begins Plantinga’s project. Plantinga evaluates the issue of whether we are rationally *justified* in believing in God. In doing so, he considers the natural theologian’s arsenal, the atheologian’s response, and whether belief in God can be salvaged from … Continue reading

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Review: Logic-A God Centered Approach (Poythress)

This isn’t a logic textbook, yet it isn’t quite a worldview approach to logic.  It is something of both, yet completely neither.  I still liked it, though. He begins with a theological “grounding” of logic, which amounts to a summary … Continue reading

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Quick Primer on Analytic Philosophy

Before the 1970s analytic philosophy hadn’t yet escaped from logical positivism.  But even Ayers saw through that.  Now analytic philosophy has been liberated.  Here are some mandatory texts: Wittgenstein, Ludwig.  Tractatus.  My favorite, even if he is utterly wrong.  He corrected … Continue reading

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Definition of Essence

Some notes from Jay Richards’ Untamed God. The definition of essence is a set of properties that an entity exemplifies (64). A property is some fact or truth about an entity in the world.  In our usage we want to say … Continue reading

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Harassing the Hobgoblins: Intro to Analytic Theology

I am not an expert in analytic theology, and I have been critical of analytic philosophy in the past.  Nonetheless, it can be useful in clarifying concepts.  One problem is that people jump into the deeper waters, reading countless computer … Continue reading

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Which Trinity? Robert Jenson

Continuing McCall’s work.  Here is a retraction on my part.  A few years ago I praised Robert Jenson’s Systematic Theology.  Indeed, there are some fine essays in there.  I must retract, however, the section on the doctrine of God. Robert … Continue reading

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Review of Dennison on Van Til

Dennison, William.  In Defense of the Eschaton.  Wipf and Stock, 2015. This is a collection of essays dealing with Van Til and Education, with a few other themes thrown in.   Some essays are quite good, particularly the one on … Continue reading

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Van til and analytic philosophy

This is from the first chapter of William Dennison’s In Defense of the Eschaton. Dennison’s first chapter places Van Til (hereafter CVT) within the context of Continental vs. Analytic philosophy and it begins on a promising note.  Few of CVT’s disciples … Continue reading

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Heretics, Continentals, and Analytics

Cyril O’Regan said every hereseology implies a genealogy (“Balthasar’s Gnostic Genealogy”).   This means evaluating heresies often implies a story of where and how the knowledge went wrong. This is precisely what Continental Philosophy specializes in. This is precisely what … Continue reading

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