Tag Archives: thomas aquinas

Sergius Bulgakov, The Bride of the Lamb

Bulgakov, Sergius.  Bride of the Lamb.  Eerdmans. This isn’t a normal review.  It’s mostly a collection and analysis of his most important points.  This is the best thing ever written on eschatology in the sense of final judgment, life-after-death, etc. Bulgakov … Continue reading

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The Future of Love (Milbank)

I’ve been critical of Radical Orthodoxy in the past.  I think it’s ontology mutes all distinctions, or wants to anyway.  Nonetheless, John Milbank is just fun to read.  And check out his twitter account. Tweets by johnmilbank3 I’m posting this … Continue reading

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Bonds of Imperfection (O’Donovan and O’Donovan)

O’Donovans, Oliver and Joan Lockwood. Bonds of Imperfection: Christian Politics Past and Present.  Eerdmans, 2007. I’ve read this book more than any other book over the past eleven years.  Each essays is a Master’s course in social ethics.  With all the … Continue reading

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Steinmetz: Calvin in Context

Steinmetz, David.  Calvin in Context.  Oxford. Steinmetz’s thesis is that one can’t abstract Calvin’s Institutes from his larger body of exegesis. We move from the Bible to the Institutes and then to the Commentaries. This book is a collection of essays … Continue reading

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O’Donovans: From Irenaeus to Grotius

O’Donovans, Oliver and Joan Lockwood.  From Irenaeus to Grotius. Eerdmans. This sourcebook is divided into five parts: The Patristic Age, Late Antiquity and Germanic Kingship, The Integration of Aristotle, Spiritual Polities and Dominum, and Renaissance and reformation. At the risk of … Continue reading

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Review: Morality after Calvin

Summers, Kirk.  Morality After Calvin.  New York: Oxford, 2017. Kirk Summers documents and illustrates the problems facing the Genevan church after Calvin’s death, as illustrated in Theodore Beza’s Cato. While Beza will defend natural law, he has no interest in constructing a … Continue reading

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A catalogue of justice

What does justice mean?  Answering this question is necessary before you start claiming you want “justice in the public sphere.”  I am looking through Oliver and Joan Lockwood O’Donovan’s From Irenaeus to Grotius on how earlier Christian thinkers reflected on justice. … Continue reading

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Review: Richard Muller’s Triunity of God

Muller, Richard.  The Triunity of God. Post Reformation Reformed Dogmatics, volume 4.  Grand Rapids: MI, Baker Academic. Given that there aren’t many specifically Reformed constructions of Trinitarianism, I would say that this book fills a woeful lacuna.  However, since it has … Continue reading

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Notes on Muller’s PRRD vol 4

Roscellin: confirmed anti-realist.  This view led him to declare that every existent thing is a unique individual: so-called universals are “mere words.” (Muller 26).   The problem with Boethuis’s definition of person:   The definition ultimately poses all manner of problems … Continue reading

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Review: Escape from Reason (Schaeffer)

In Schaeffer’s other works he shows you step by step on how to “take the roof off” of a stoned-up hippie.  He doesn’t do that in this one. This is more of a Dooyeweerdian (though he never acknowledges it) deconstruction … Continue reading

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