Tag Archives: thomas mccall

Zizioulas: Being as Communion

If I criticized Western models of the Trinity in the last post, I am going to push back against some fashionable Eastern models in this one. Zizzy notes that ancient Greek thought maintained a diversity in spite of apparent unity … Continue reading

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An Apologetics Primer

My church group began discussing ideas about an apologetics course this summer.  I’m wondering what kind of books to use.  Nothing too advanced.  And I don’t want this to become a “different styles of apologetics.”  Those discussions are usually as … Continue reading

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Review: McCall, Invitation to Analytic Theology

This is an old review, but I thought I had already posted it.  I hadn’t. Despite it’s relatively simple-sounding and generic title, this book is unique in offering both a model for analytic theology as well as a brief crash … Continue reading

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On not being a Barthian

I get asked this every now and then.  I’m not a Barthian.  The most notable problem is his view of Scripture (at least that’s what alarms evangelicals the most).  Thomas McCall gives a fine presentation and critique of Barth’s view … Continue reading

Posted in American Evangelicalism, theology | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Which Trinity? Robert Jenson

Continuing McCall’s work.  Here is a retraction on my part.  A few years ago I praised Robert Jenson’s Systematic Theology.  Indeed, there are some fine essays in there.  I must retract, however, the section on the doctrine of God. Robert … Continue reading

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Latin Trinitarianism, again

I am currently reading Thomas Mccall’s Which Trinity? Whose Monotheism? This is the best section of the book.  He deals with philosopher Brian Leftow, who openly says there are “personal parts” in God (Leftow, “A Latin Trinity,” 308, quoted in McCall … Continue reading

Posted in Book Review, Scholasticism, theology | Tagged , , , , | 8 Comments